Let’s keep the cash

In recent months the media have begun to discuss the cashless economy, which does not use physical cash but only credit cards or other forms of electronic payment (e.g. PayPal).

ENTREPRENEURS IN SLOVAKIA SPEND 140 HOURS ANNUALLY COMPLYING WITH BUREAUCRATIC RED TAPE

Small entrepreneurs in Slovakia spend 140 hours annually — about 17.5 full working days — navigating the country’s complex regulatory red tape. That’s one of the startling findings from the new “Bureaucracy Index” launched by the Institute of Economic and Social Studies (INESS), an Atlas Network partner based in Slovakia. Those 140 hours of regulatory grappling include an average of 75 administrative tasks that cost €1,471.50 (US$1,565.31) per year.

INESS is an independent, non-governmental and non-political civic association. All of our activities are financed by grants, 2% tax allocation, own activities and donations from individuals and legal entities. Thus, our operation, scope and quality of outputs, largely depends on your generosity.

Raiding tax havens won’t solve our problems

The rich know how to evade taxes better than the middle class. After the Panama papers leak, this much should be clear even to the less well-informed. Every name plucked from the Panama bag, over-brimming with appalling news as it is, adds to the allure of Asian property and income anonymization schemes. Migrations towards the eastern tax havens didn’t start with Panama. It’s been ongoing for at least a decade, propped up by the Great Recession when it had transpired that the European commercial and bank secrets aren’t what they used to be, and that the United States can manhandle even Switzerland. A depth is lacking in the public discourse spurred by recent revelations.

Healthy Profit

INESS – The Institute of Economic and Social Studies has decided to contribute its arguments to the discussion of the legitimacy and utility of profit in healthcare through its latest publication, Zdravý zisk (Healthy Profit).

Slovak Health Care Reform – Is the Dream Over?

In this paper the author - Juraj Karpiš - criticizes Mises theory of monopoly prices from an Austrian perspective. He attempts to show, that the purpose of identifying monopoly prices in an unhampered market isn’t worth following, because the concept of hurt consumer supremacy by not acting on the side of producers is not compatible with universal property rights. Further He argues that lack of knowledge about the demand elasticity and the real purpose of the supply restriction (which are two main monopoly price creating factors) make the quest for monopoly prices identification a highly subjective venture, on which no antitrust action can be based.

Mises on Monopoly Prices - A Critique

In this paper the author - Juraj Karpiš - criticizes Mises theory of monopoly prices from an Austrian perspective. He attempts to show, that the purpose of identifying monopoly prices in an unhampered market isn’t worth following, because the concept of hurt consumer supremacy by not acting on the side of producers is not compatible with universal property rights. Further He argues that lack of knowledge about the demand elasticity and the real purpose of the supply restriction (which are two main monopoly price creating factors) make the quest for monopoly prices identification a highly subjective venture, on which no antitrust action can be based.

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